Marywood Student Speech-Language-Hearing Association Earns HonorsN

Speech Language photo

Marywood University Chapter of the National Student Speech-Language-Hearing Association (NSSLHA) was informed by the National NSSLHA Executive Council that the chapter earned Gold Chapter Honors for the 2016-2017 academic year.

Officers include, front row, from left: Kristen Meyer, secretary, and Rachel Panick, president.

Back row: Nicole Coombs, treasurer, and Zachary Lowe, vice president. Chapters who earn Gold Honors are credited for “increasing awareness of communication disorders among state and federal legislators; supporting clients, students, and organizations in their community; creating vibrant online conversations in the NSSLHA Community; providing monetary donations to support scholarships for students in CSD programs by contributing to the ASHFoundation NSSLHA Scholarship; and by providing monetary donations which will provide resources to those who are served by CommunicAID+Nation (the NSSLHA Loves 2016–17 recipient).

 

Dunmorean of the Month: Taylor Perry

Dunmorean of the Month - Taylor PerryBy Steve Svetovich

Dunmore High School graduate Taylor Perry and her fiancé Josh McWilliams started a chiropractic business in the borough this past November and business is starting to boom.

Daughter of John and Leann Perry, Dunmore, Taylor, 27, is a 2008 graduate of Dunmore High School.

She received a bachelor of science degree in Kinesiology from Temple University in 2012. She finished with a 3.4 grade point average and added a certificate in Spanish for health professions.

Taylor also studied abroad in Spain during her college years and was one of the founders of the Chiropractic Club at Temple University.

During her time at Dunmore High School, Taylor was a member of the softball team, the national honor society and the yearbook staff.

Taylor went on from Temple to graduate from Palmer Chiropractic College in Daytona Beach, Fla., in 2016. She spent three and one-half years there.

She and her fiancé, who is from Wisconsin, opened up Dunmore Family Chiropractic, 439 East Drinker St., Dunmore, this past November.

“It is just the two of us,” she said. “We do the billing, office work, treatments and everything.”

dunmore chiropracticTaylor said she expects to grow quickly. “We are looking to expand. We want to hire an associate and branch out into supplements, nutrition and health foods. We have also hired a massage therapist. We can do x-rays on site.

“We want to offer our clients everything possible to lead healthy lives.”

The young chiropractor said she and her fiancé accept most insurances. “The location here in Dunmore could not be better. There are so many people who drive by and see our sign. The practice is doing great. We are getting a lot of referrals.”

Taylor said she is a big believer in a holistic approach to healing. “I like to teach clients to try to be healthy first. People are opening their eyes to chiropractic care and taking a more holistic approach initially. We are finding that opioids and pain medicine do not often help. It can be a cover up to the problem at hand. We want to fix the problem and not hide it.”

Taylor said her parents were a big inspiration to her. “Both of my parents own businesses and were always very hard working. My dad owns Perry Contracting in Dunmore and my mom owns Leanne’s Academy of Learning, a day care and pre-school.

“Because of what I saw in them, I always knew I would own my own business.”

The road to chiropractic school came after a little soul searching.

temple“I always wanted to help people and work with my hands. I worked with my hands helping my dad in his contracting business.

“I didn’t want to go to medical school. And I wanted to help people naturally. I shadowed a chiropractor who spoke in one of my classes at Temple. And that was it. I made my decision then.”

Taylor, industrious and ambitious, is enjoying every minute of her profession. “I just want to be a part of people’s lives helping them live healthier in a more natural way.”

 

Dunmore Farmers Market Now Open for Second Season

Farmers Market Banner

By Emily Fedor

Last summer, the lot that has sat empty and barren for years along the 200 block of East Drinker Street was given new purpose, filled with new life and stocked with lots of fresh produce. Now, the Dunmore Farmers Market is back open and ready for a successful second season.

The idea of a farmers market in the town of the Bucks was batted around for years. Then in June of 2016, that idea blossomed into a reality with a bit of a push from Borough Councilman Tom Hallinan and the late Karl Wegforth.

“We finally just said ‘Let’s run with it,’” said Hallinan. “I asked Karl if he wanted to participate, and he was more than willing. He adopted it like it was his son and was there every Saturday. He’s a big part of it that’s going to be missing this year.”

wegforth

Karl Wegforth of Dunmore passed away on January 22, 2017 at the age of 63.

Wegforth passed away in January at the age of 63. He was a graduate of Dunmore High School, a former animal control officer for the borough and owner of the old Weggy’s Bar. But many knew him as president of the Dunmore Historical Society.

Last year, he and Hallinan worked together to round up a number of area vendors to set up shop every Saturday during the summer.

A major purpose of the market is to offer shoppers the opportunity to buy locally made products. Borough Business Administrator Vito Ruggiero says it also serves as a way to highlight the restaurants and shops based in the borough of Dunmore.

“The borough is invested in our business district and our town,” said Ruggiero. “So to try and create a one stop shop for all of our residents and get the businesses involved is what we’re trying to do. We’re hoping that the buzz gets out there.”

This year, the farmers market will feature several returning vendors as well as plenty of newcomers, who will be selling everything from sunflowers and fresh baked goods to lipsticks and hairbows.

sunflowerHallinan says the market is also welcoming non-profit groups to set up shop this year. They simply have to contact the borough to reserve a spot.

Helene Hopkins, owner of the Scranton-based Mulberry Bush, is bringing fresh produce and flowers to the farmers market for the second year. She says participating in the farmers market has brought new customers to her business.

“It’s always good to get out in the community and let people know what you have,” said Hopkins. “It sounds funny, but a lot of people from Dunmore have said ‘Oh, we had no idea you were there!’”

Jena Romanini, owner of Savvy Home on Blakely Street, is also a returning vendor. This year, her stand will feature a number of products including soy candles and goat milk soaps, as well as some urban-farm style home decor.

As her business is relatively new, Romanini said the market has really helped get her get the word out. She says she’s also enjoyed seeing people come out to enjoy everything the borough has to offer.

“When you drive through Dunmore anymore, it’s not like it used to be on Saturdays,”  said Romanini. “When the farmers market’s going on, It’s nice to see people walking through and cars parked everywhere.”  

Securing a spot each Saturday comes at no cost to vendors. Hallinan emphasizes the goal of the farmers market is not necessarily to make money, but to highlight the Bucktown business district.

historical societyThat being said, at the end of this season, vendors have been asked to make a donation to the Dunmore Historical Society in the name of the market’s co-founder, Karl Wegforth.

“Karl was the type of guy who liked getting involved in things that brought people together,” said Ruggiero. “He’s smiling because he sees [the market] is continuing and that more people are getting involved.”

This year, there are more vendors involved than the last, and the hope is that this trend will continue. And when that hopefully happens, Hallinan and Ruggiero say the parking lot adjacent to the VFW building on Chestnut Street could also become home to some market vendors.

The Dunmore Farmers Market is open for business on Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. now until September 2.

 

Former Dunmore Pitcher Marc Perry is a “Baseball Lifer”

Marc Perry photo

By Steve Svetovich

Some ball players never want to take the uniform off. Take Marc Perry, for instance.

Perry was in the Dunmore High School baseball program for four years as a pitcher and then went on to pitch three more seasons for Wilkes University, and he’s not done yet.

That’s because Perry considers himself a baseball lifer.

“I love the game of baseball and want to play as long as I can.”

And that he has been doing. The hard throwing right hander pitched for the past three years in the summer Dunmore Freedom League at Sherwood Park. He also pitches for the Electric City Bootleggers in the Pocono Valley League.

In a recent game with the Bootleggers, he had a no hitter going until it was broken up with two outs in the fifth inning. He ended up giving up only two hits in six innings. It was a strong effort despite a loss.

Son of Ron and Stephanie Perry, Dunmore, Marc, 24, graduated from Dunmore High School in 2011. He played two seasons of junior varsity and two years of varsity baseball at Dunmore. His varsity baseball coach was Mark Finan.

Perry, who has a quiet confidence, went on to Wilkes University where he graduated in 2015 with a B.S. in Marketing. He pitched for Wilkes in his freshman, sophomore and junior years. He was coached by Matthew Hollod in his final two seasons.

Perry said he was highly impressed by a pitching coach, Tyler Shepple, he had in his sophomore year at Wilkes. Shepple was once drafted by the Milwaukee Brewers. “He taught me a lot about pitching mechanics and motion. He helped to improve my velocity. I was able to throw harder and be much more competitive. He was also better at calling my pitches than any coach I ever had. I have to give him a lot of credit for teaching me a lot about pitching.”

Perry, hard working and humble, also gave credit to Mike Guy, his coach for the Scranton Miners travel team. Perry is also a graduate of the Dunmore American Legion baseball program.

Perry currently works for Maximum Federal Services in Pittston. He processes health insurance appeals for the Affordable Health Care Act.

The baseball lifer said he owes a lot to his parents. “My parents taught me to be humble and respectful. They taught me to respect the game of baseball. They taught me to be a good person. They really taught me everything I know.”

The Dunmore graduate talked about his future.

“Right now, I enjoy my work. I would eventually like to move to Philadelphia and be with a company where I can grow and advance my career.

“I enjoy playing baseball and love to compete. I will continue playing baseball in the summer for as long as I can. Right now, I play in the two summer leagues. I love it too much to ever quit. I can’t imagine not playing. I’ll go as long as I can. I just love the game.”