Diocese of Scranton to Host Annual Vocations Golf Classic

Golf-Ball-on-TeeThe Diocese of Scranton will host the eighth annual Vocations Golf Classic will be held Monday, July 10, at Blue Ridge Trail Golf Club, Mountain Top, to support the St. John Vianney Endowment, which helps foster vocations to the Diocesan priesthood and support seminarians in formation. St. John Vianney is the patron of parish priests.

The captain and crew tournament begins with lunch at 11 a.m. and shotgun start at noon. A reception and awards dinner follows play. To donate or register online, visit www.DioceseofScranton.org and click the “Giving” tab – Vocations Golf; or call the Diocesan Development Office at 570-207-2250.

Bishop Joseph C. Bambera is honorary chair and will be golfing in the captain and crew tournament on the 27-hole course. The day begins with lunch at 11 a.m., shotgun start at noon and reception and awards dinner immediately following play. Rev. Donald J. Williams, diocesan director of vocations and director of seminarians, is event chair.

“I am grateful for the faithful parishioners and friends throughout the 11 counties of the Diocese of Scranton who continue to attend and support this annual event which raises needed funds to foster vocations and assist future priests on their journey to serve our local Church,” said Bishop Bambera.

“As a Diocese, we are blessed with good men in seminarian formation today,” said Rev. Williams. “With the support of our priests, religious and parishioners, we’re identifying a significant number of potential candidates who may one day be of service to the Diocese.”

“I join with our Bishop and the golf committee in urging everyone to consider making a donation honoring a friend or loved one,” the vocations director added. “All gifts in support of our seminarians are appreciated. The tournament provides an opportunity for golfers, sponsors and seminarians to meet informally and enjoy a relaxing day outdoors.”

Donations of any amount are welcome. Hole sponsorships are $100. Golfer packages are $250 and include cart and green fees, lunch, dinner and reception. Donations may be made by texting 51-555 and typing Priest. Information is available by calling the Diocesan development office at 570-207-2250 or on-line at DioceseofScranton.org (Giving tab).

Diocesan Golf Committee 2017

Committee members planning the event in conjunction with the Diocesan Office of Development are, seated from left: Marilouise Agnone Ruane, Director of Stewardship, co-chair; Msgr. Donald McAndrews; Rev. Donald Williams, Director of Vocations and Seminarians, chair; and Msgr. David Bohr, Secretary for Clergy Formation. Standing: Christopher DiMattio, Tom Considine, Dominic Rinaldi, Rev. Jeffrey Walsh, Rev.d David Cappelloni, Michael P. Brown and Jim Bebla, Secretary for Development.

The committee also includes: John Callahan, Karen Clifford, Reverend Joseph Evanko, Deacon Frank Hine, Michele Long, Scott Lynett, Thomas Medico, Attorney Joseph O’Brien, Kathy Oven, Frank Orlando, and Mark Soprano.

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Area Priests Celebrate Ordination Anniversaries

Priest Jubilarians pic

Bishop Joseph C. Bambera was principal celebrant of a Mass in the Catehdral of St. Peter to honor priests of the Diocese of Scranton who are celebrating milestone ordination anniversaries this year.

Pictured after the mass are, front row from left: Reverend Patrick L. Albert, 25 years; Auxiliary Bishop Emeritus John M. Dougherty, 60 years; Bishop Bambera; Reverend Joseph A. Kearney, 50 years, and Reverend Joseph O. Weber, 60 years.

Back row: Reverend Jeffrey J. Walsh, V.E., Episcopal Vicar for Clergy; Reverend E. Francis Kelly, 50 years; Reverend Michael J. Rafferty, 60 years; Reverend Edward P. Lyman, 50 years; Monsignor John J. Bendik, 50 years; Monsignor Joseph G. Rauscher, 50 years; Reverend Richard E. Fox, 25 years; and Monsignor Thomas M. Muldowney, V.G., Vicar General of the Diocese.

Priests celebrating jubilees who were not able to attend the Mass are Reverend Alex J. Hazzouri, 60 years; Monsignor William P. Ward, 60 years; and Reverend Richard A. Zavacki, 60 years.

Pennsylvania Bishops Dedicate Dioceses to Protection of Blessed Mother

bambera

Most Reverend Joseph C. Bambera, D.D., J.C.L, Bishop of Scranton.

On May 1, during their Provincial meeting, the Bishops of Pennsylvania affirmed their desire to dedicate each Catholic diocese and eparchy in the Commonwealth to the protection of the Blessed Mother.

The dedication coincides with the Church’s observance of the 100th anniversary of the Blessed Mother’s appearances to three young shepherd children near the town of Fatima, Portugal between May 13 and October 13, 1917.

“Our world today is just as much in need of healing and mercy as it was a century ago, and so we invoke the tender care of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Mother of Our Lord and our Mother,” said the Most Reverend Joseph C. Bambera, D.D., J.C.L., Bishop of Scranton.

The Bishop then went on to quote Pope Francis, who will be visiting the Shrine of Our Lady of Fatima in Portugal on May 12 and 13, 2017: “Mary reminds us of the necessity of abandoning oneself to God, the source of love and mercy. … Let us entrust ourselves to Mary, Mother of hope, who invites us to turn our gaze towards salvation, towards a new world and a new humanity.”

The official dedication of the Commonwealth’s dioceses and eparchies to the protection of Mary will be marked with a special Mass to be celebrated by all the Bishops of Pennsylvania on Sept.r 27, 2017 at noon in Saint Patrick’s Cathedral in Harrisburg.

The second part of the dedication will be an observance in each diocese and eparchy on the weekend of Oct. 14-15.

In honor of the centennial of Our Lady of Fatima’s appearances, Bishop Bambera is also leading a special pilgrimage to Spain and Portugal Sept. 18-26, 2017.

Bishop Bambera Releases Statement on President Trump’s Executive Order

President Donald Trump Signs Executive OrdersThe United States has a long and proud history of welcoming persons from other countries who come to our land seeking freedom to practice their religion, live in safety and work hard to provide a decent life for their families. Indeed, the region of the Diocese of Scranton owes much of its heritage and prosperity to immigrants who have and continue to contribute greatly to the fabric of life in northeastern and north central Pennsylvania.

Not unlike those who settled in the United States a century ago, the vast majority of today’s immigrants simply seek a better life for themselves and their families. Sadly, many of these same individuals also look to our great land as a refuge in the face of persecution, war and terror in their homelands. These refugees are vetted through a rigorous program that has proven to be effective over the course of many years.

Our Catholic faith calls us to respect life: to welcome the stranger, to treat every life with dignity and respect, and to offer compassion to all, regardless of their country of origin or religious background. Simply put, turning our backs on the most vulnerable in need of our help is not consistent with the values upon which our country was founded and is not consistent with the message of the gospel of Jesus.

Pope Francis urged Americans to put aside fear and instead offer the world hope and solidarity. In 2015, he shared these challenging words to members of the United States Congress and to the people of America,“If we want security, let us give security; if we want life, let us give life; if we want opportunities, let us provide opportunities.”